The world’s first engineering-based college of medicine is here.

New health challenges, scientific understandings, and technologies call for a new approach to medical training. That’s why we designed the Carle Illinois College of Medicine, the first engineering-based medical school in the world.

Leading the way to better healthcare for all.

By bringing together medical education and engineering-informed innovation in one program, we’re not only changing the way medicine is taught and practiced, we’re ushering in a future where excellent healthcare is available to everyone. It’s an exciting and vital journey—one that we invite everyone to be a part of.

Carle Illinois College of Medicine first class members.  July 3, 2018

Our approach involves applying "engineering thinking" to medical school curriculum and clinical practice. The outcome will be doctors and patients who are able to make better decisions, be more preventative, and solve more human health problems.

What drives us?

Compassion

as we care for patients and improve the human condition.

Competence

in training board-certified physicians who are also innovators.

Curiosity

that challenges the status quo and drives new ways of thinking.

Creativity

to spark unprecedented solutions to healthcare problems.

Phani Gaddipati, Dean King Li, Carle Illinois College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Carle Illinois: On the verge of a health care revolution

“It’s the opportunity of a lifetime.” That’s how Dr. King Li describes his role as dean of the Carle Illinois College of Medicine, the first and only medical school at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

When asked to explain what makes the founding of Carle Illinois so momentous in the vast and impressive field of medicine, here’s what Dean Li said:

“For the past 100 or so years, medical education has been focused on two pillars: basic science and clinical science. At Carle Illinois, we have the opportunity to build our medical school on four pillars, adding technology and the humanities to basic science and clinical science.

The role of the physician is to understand patients, their families, and their environments, and to help them make the right choice for treatment in their particular situation. Machines can’t and shouldn’t do that.

“Technology will help physicians’ tasks be more accurate and efficient. Often technology is seen as increasing costs, dehumanizing care, and making certain treatments only accessible to patients with the financial resources. But an intelligent deployment of technology will make it possible to decrease costs and increase the level of human care physicians can give, ultimately providing higher quality care to more people.

“Some people wonder what doctors will do if machines can collect and record health data. The role of the physician is to understand patients, their families, and their environments, and to help them make the right choice for treatment in their particular situation. Machines can’t and shouldn’t do that.

“Health care is on the verge of a revolution. At Carle Illinois, we’re right on the cusp—we’re training the leaders of the next generation, the physicians who will lead that revolution.”

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